Mark Reep - Pencil, Ink and Graphite
HomeNewsGalleryShopClassesMaking itCommisionsAboutLinksContact

Mark Reep

Mark Reep’s charcoal, graphite, and ink drawings invite close examination: Look again, and you’ll likely you’ll find something you hadn’t seen before.

Mark says, “I’ve always liked art with depth and detail that offers not only initial impact, but also allows ongoing discovery. The joy of exploration and discovery is a valued part of my own process, and I also enjoy the challenge of refining detail at an intimate scale. So hopefully, viewers can continue to explore and discover as well.”

“My drawings are often about quiet places, moments of reflection, dreams. Those times, as Robert Henri said, ‘when we seem to see beyond the usual.’”

Mark's drawing media include charcoal and graphite pencils (he sharpens a lot) and fine-pointed drawing pens (he’s been known to sharpen those too). And erasers, lots of erasers.

Born in 1960, Mark is an artist, writer, and editor of the online lit and arts quarterly Ramshackle Review. He lives and works in New York’s Finger Lakes region.

There is a demonstration of how Mark works featured on the website here.

© Mark Reep

Radio Free Atlantis
Original Charcoal & Graphite drawing
5” x 7” Matted to 8 ½” x 11”
£690

© Mark Reep

Not All the Old Doors
Original Ink, Graphite, Charcoal drawing
8 ½” x 11” Matted to 12” x 16”
£810

© Mark Reep

No Earthen Vessel
Original Ink, Charcoal & Graphite drawing
9 ½” x 3 7/8” Matted to 12” x 17”
£935

© Mark Reep

Point of Grace
Original Graphite, Charcoal drawing
8 ½” x 11” Matted to 12” x 16”
£875

© Mark Reep

Forgiveness
Original Charcoal & Graphite drawing
9” x 4 ½” Matted to 12” x 16”
£810

© Mark Reep

Hawthorn
Original Ink, Graphite, Charcoal drawing
5 5/16” x 2 5/16”Matted to 8” x 10”
£ 565

© Mark Reep

Abandoned Quarry
Original Charcoaldrawing
6 ½” x 4 ½” Matted to 8” x 10”
£440

© Mark Reep

Crossing
Original Graphite, Charcoal drawing
6 ½” x 4 ½” Matted to 8” x 10”
£500

© Mark Reep

That Morning's Light
Original Charcoal & Graphite drawing
4 1/8” x 7 1/8” Matted to 11” x 14”
£500

© Mark Reep

All the Silent Years
Original Graphite, Charcoal drawing
8 ½” x 13”” Matted to 16” x 20”
£1060

© Mark Reep

Home is The Sailor
Original Charcoal & Graphite drawing
5 7/8" x 3 1/8" Matted & framed to 11" x 8 1/2"
£465

© Mark Reep

Morning Prayer
Original Charcoal & Graphite drawing
5 ½” x 3 ½” Matted to 11” x 14”
£525

© Mark Reep

Lost Dream
Original Ink, Graphite, Charcoal drawing
6” x 4 ¾” Matted to 11” x 14”
£525

© Mark Reep

Loch Traignarry Light
Original Charcoal & Graphite drawing
4 ¼” x 3 ¼” Matted and framed to 10” x 8”
£435

Loch Traignarry Light

Built in 1817 by Scottish coal magnate Thomas Dain to ensure safe passage of his barges, the Loch Traignarry Light was also intended as a model of innovation, with a coal-burning lamp fed by a chain-driven conveyor drawing on coal bins built near the waterline. When this proved impracticable, Dain reluctantly ordered the installation of the oil-burning Argand lamp widely in use at the time. This lamp served until 1822, when Dain purchased one of the first Fresnel refracting lenses to become available. In 1871, the lighthouse was fitted with the revolutionary Holmes magneto-electro arc light.

In 1874, a fire caused by an apparent lightning strike damaged the tower and destroyed the adjoining wood-framed keeper’s cottage. The longtime lightkeeper, his wife and granddaughter all escaped unharmed, but the keeper’s logs, dating from the lamp’s first lighting, were lost. When the keeper’s wife insisted their new cottage be built at what she considered a safe remove, Thomas Dain agreed, commissioning a local architect to design a two-story home some 120 meters inland. This project was Dain’s last; following a site visit on a blustery spring day in 1875, he contracted pneumonia and died before construction was completed. Three months later, Thomas Dain II dedicated the new keeper’s house, naming it in memory of his father.

In 1903 a compressed-air foghorn was installed atop the light. The horn sounded nightly until 1937, when it was replaced by a radio beacon broadcasting Morse code. In 1967, the light was automated. In 1989, following a review by the Northern Lighthouse Board, the light was decommissioned, and fell into neglect for nearly a decade. In 1998, the light and keeper’s house were purchased by the Traignarry Light Preservation Society, who began the task of repair and restoration.

This rendering for a fundraising campaign finds the disused coal bins overgrown, the steps of the waterstair crumbling. But the tower’s stonework has been repointed, its ironwork and glazing replaced, and the blackened foundations of the original keeper’s cottage, just inland of the light proper, now bound a small wildflower garden. The Traignarry Light Preservation Society meets monthly at the Thomas Dain house, and welcomes visitors and volunteers.

- from A History of Loch Traignarry Light, Thomas Dain Estate, publisher. Used by permission.

To purchase any of the featured work please call the gallery on 01738 621836 during store hours or use the contact form to make an enquiry. Purchases can be made using Paypal or over the phone by credit card at the gallery.

Pay by card or PayPal

Back to the Shop page